8 more memorable quotes from Lance Armstrong's interview with Oprah

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Lance Armstrong’s deceptions might deplete his estimated $125 million net worth now that the cyclist …

We weren't sure Lance Armstrong would have much left to say to Oprah Winfrey in the second installment of "Oprah's Next Chapter." He'd already admitted to doping, lying, and myriad other narcissistic sins in the first segment. But the second part still had a few remarkable remarks in store. Below, eight things that made us go "hmm" from the final part of the interview.

Armstrong called his decision to step down as the Livestrong chairman "the most humbling moment" in the process. "That was the lowest."


Watching a 2005 deposition in which he claimed he would never dope, not just because it meant a ban because winning "is not as important as losing the support of hundreds of millions of people," Armstrong looked nauseated and said, "That's sick. …I don't like that guy."

Why would he lie so brazenly – to the very millions he claimed he was responsible to? "That is a guy who felt invincible, was told he was invincible, truly felt he was invincible," Armstrong sighed, then admitted, "I'm not going to lie to you or the public – that guy is still there." But he also said that "he need[s] to be exiting through this process."


[Related: The most memorable moments from Part 1]


He spoke directly to Livestrong supporters (a reported 80 million of the ubiquitous yellow rubber bracelets have been sold): "I understand your anger, your sense of betrayal … you supported me forever, through all of this, and you believed, and I lied to you - and I'm sorry." Armstrong will spend as long as it takes to "make amends," but acknowledged, "I won't get very many back."

His ex-wife, Kristin, maintained plausible deniability about his doping, but "believes the truth will set you free," according to Armstrong – and when he wanted to make his comeback, she insisted that he do it clean. He believed upon his return that he'd come back to a "level playing field."Armstrong had the hardest time talking about confessing to his kids. His 13-year-old son, Luke, had been defending him against the charges; that's when Armstrong knew he had to stop fighting. "I had to say something; this is out of control," he said, and he told Luke, "I said, 'Don't defend me anymore. …Don't.'"

"This isn't the worst part of my life," Armstrong said. "This is not a good time," but the cancer diagnosis was worse.

Winfrey asked if he would rise again. Armstrong thought for a moment. "I don't know."

The next installment of "Oprah's Next Chapter" features Drew Barrymore.
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