Bindi Irwin, Are You Alive?

Yahoo TV
This 2012 photo released by the Hallmark Channel shows Bindi Irwin star of the film "Return to Nim's Island," the sequel to the 2008 action-adventure movie "Nim's Island," premiering March 15, 2013 on the Hallmark Channel. The Hallmark Channel is making Friday nights a home for family movies. Hallmark says the movie, starring Irwin, the 14-year-old daughter of the late Steve Irwin, the Australian crocodile hunter, will air as part of the new "Walden Family Theater" series, a Hallmark Channel collaboration with producer Walden Media, ARC Entertainment studio and sponsors Wal-Mart and Procter & Gamble. (AP Photo/Hallmark Channel)
.

View photo

This 2012 photo released by the Hallmark Channel shows Bindi Irwin star of the film "Return to Nim's Island," the sequel to the 2008 action-adventure movie "Nim's Island," premiering March 15, 2013 on the Hallmark Channel. The Hallmark Channel is making Friday nights a home for family movies. Hallmark says the movie, starring Irwin, the 14-year-old daughter of the late Steve Irwin, the Australian crocodile hunter, will air as part of the new "Walden Family Theater" series, a Hallmark Channel collaboration with producer Walden Media, ARC Entertainment studio and sponsors Wal-Mart and Procter & Gamble. (AP Photo/Hallmark Channel)

While rumors of the death of Steve Irwin's 14-year-old daughter, Bindi Irwin, swamped the Internet, the late "Crocodile Hunter's" protégé was in fact up to her regular routine of working with animals and being a teenager.

Who said the 14-year-old Aussie died? It's easy to want to pinpoint one person.

But the truth is, the report of Bindi's faux death was caused by a huge mass of people, specifically, as Social News Daily puts it, a "trend hiccup": an Internet glitch that arises from misleading word-association trends.

[Related: The Tweet that Lost (Not Really) Katee Sackhoff 100,000 Followers]

When people grew interested in her new film, "Return from Nim's Island," many of them typed in the search term "Steve Irwin's daughter" instead of her actual name, Bindi. With the words "Steve Irwin," the name of her famous wildlife-expert father, who passed away in 2006, entered into the search mixer, the equation spit out the term "Steve Irwin daughter dies" and thus the striking words were reproduced through Twitter trends yesterday. To state it simply, the Internet, its users, and the search engines were very, very confused and didn't question the game of Scrabble that ensued.

Despite what the Internet says, Bindi is still thriving as a youthful wildlife conservationist Wednesday, she shared a pleasant image from the beach on Instagram along with a tweet of an interview in Hong Kong — social media's proof of her active career and personal life.

Bindi once said, "Every time you lose an animal, it's like losing a brick from the house. Pretty soon the house just falls down, you know?" Apparently a lot of folks on the Internet thought they lost their animal-saving super star, and the big bad wolf of erroneous search trends blew that house down.

View Comments (2)